Archive for the ‘Documentary’ Category

Comedian Pat Shortt and Creative technology students, recording an episode of his Podcast, The Wellness Hour with Paaah, in the LSAD studio, Moylish Campus.

With the deadline for the 2022 CAO fast approaching, why not check out the Creative Technology Programmes at LSAD, TUS.

Creative Broadcast & Film Production – Level 8 (CSO POINTS 310)

Editing timeline for the in-house student production, ‘Word on the Street’.

This skills based programme offers students an exciting opportunity to explore the world of the broadcast media industry, covering a range of disciplines across film and TV production, visual effects, editing, radio, audio mixing, photography, as well as broadcast technologies across a range of new and traditional media platforms.
We offer our students a range of prospects for both academic and career progression in the broadcast, film, and creative media industries, as well as extensive hands on production work experience. If you have a story to tell, we will show you how.

Features of the programme:
• Industry led Production & Post Production Practices;
• Digital Photography & Cinematography Techniques;
• Creative Design for CGI, VFX & Digital Art Direction;
• Participate in the Limerick International Film Festival (Hosted by the Film Production programme);
• Work in our state of the art Millennium Theatre on a range of live events.

*****

Music Technology & Production – Level 8 (CSO POINTS 377)

One of many music performances that take place in our Millennium Theatre.

This programme is designed for students wishing to build a career in the Music and Audio production industry. Graduates will have the knowledge and skills needed to perform at a high-level in a number of modern technical environments, including: recording studios, video editing suites, and in live theatre.

Graduates will know the principles and operation of studio equipment in both digital and analogue realms; will learn the specifics of music, musical instruments and factors affecting the quality of recording, including: mixing, mastering and mass production. Later in the programme, an emphasis is placed on the music business and business planning, particularly in relation to events and events management.

Music Technology and Production students have access to state-of-the-art recording and production facilities at TUS and our experienced lecturers give students the thorough, hands-on and personal support they need to  make the most of their studies. Features of the programme include producing music, i.e. recording, synthesizing sequencing, composing, performing, editing, evaluating, marketing and selling music.

*****

For more information on these programmes, LSAD and TUS check out the website HERE or clicking the image below.

The first episode of Word On The Street (Series 5) has just been released. Produced by the students and staff of Creative Broadcast & Film Production, the episode covers stories from the Moylish Campus, Wickham Way Market in Limerick and the Crescent Shopping Centre.

This is a Film CEL (Film Craftsmanship, Excellence & Learning) production and will form a number of programmes in the future for students to hone their learnt skills and creativity.

More soon.

Film Post Production Editor / Lecturer Simon McGuire at the 2019 LSAD open day demonstrating trailer editing.

Our TUS campus open days are an ideal opportunity for you, your friends and family to join us on campus and find out first-hand what it is really like to be a student at TUS and if you are thinking about a career in the Film, Broadcast or Music Industries then why not check out the LSAD Open Day on November 27th from 10 – 2pm on the Moylish Campus.

There will be representatives from the academic staff as well as current students to chat to you about our programmes:

Creative Broadcast & Film Production

Music Technology & Production

For more info and registering for this event check out HERE or click on the photo above.

Simon giving a production planning workshop at Castletroy College, Limerick. Photo: Joe Shortt.

Taking play at Castletroy College on November 5 was the first of a series of workshops for Students wishing to study film making for transition year and beyond.

With an audience made up of TY and 5th year students, as well as some teaching staff, LSAD/ TUS lecturer, Simon McGuire spoke of his experience in taking a simple short film idea and realising through practical and theoretical planning to get it to screen.

Students began with a pitching session of their film ideas where they democratically choose their favourite script to make over the coming months. Their mission to enter the completed film to the Fresh Film Festival in 2022. Not an easy challenge for a student group who haven’t attempted this before, but their enthusiasm certainly showed throughout the workshop.

Simon’s goal was to take the chosen idea and brain storm with the students through practical demonstration and discussions, to help inspire them to realise the narrative and processes needed to bring the film to life.

Camera composition, as well as directing techniques were imparted to students as well as what to look out for when selecting locations and positioning actors in a scene.

The Castletroy Students will now move onto the scripting process as well as completing the preproduction planning before filming begins.

As production nears its end, Simon will return once again to give the students a workshop on post production for short film, where students will learn multiple editing processes for content and narrative creation.

More on this story soon.

LSAD, LIT Graduate Showcase 2021 “RALLY” launches online for second year running

LIT’s Limerick School of Art & Design final year students launch their graduate showcase online for the second-year in a row.

RALLY the Limerick School of Art & Design Graduate Showcase of 2021 launches (Saturday May 29, 2020) at 3pm on https://www.facebook.com/LIT.LSAD with a series of documentaries depicting how this year’s graduates continued to create during the pandemic.

Creative Broadcast & Film Production and Music Technology & Production Graduates will feature from 3pm. Do check out the specially commissioned documentary by former Graduate Steve Hall (Hallway Media). See the promotional video below.

Well done to all the students on their work and achievements on what has been a very challenging year for all.

Simon.

A community response to a community issue.

The Garda Youth Diversion Project at Moyross Youth Academy in partnership with the Lifesaver Project and supported by the National Ambulance Service, Roads Policing, LIT and others have launched the “Project Off-Road” on Wednesday the 19th May 2021 at Corpus Christi School in Moyross, Limerick City. Project Off-Road is a community response to a growing problem with young men and women who are driving quad bikes and scramblers and other motorized vehicles on roads, paths and across the greens in urban areas. This community based project is aimed at moving these young people away from this dangerous, nuisance and illegal behaviors and onto the track, classroom and workshop with a safe and controlled environment where they can learn about the mechanics of motorcycles and how to drive them properly. The Moyross Youth Academy has partnered with The Lifesaver Project, a road safety education program which has been running in Limerick since 2006. The Lifesaver Project is run by An Garda Síochána and the HSE and supported by Limerick City and County Council. Sgt. Tony Miniter from the Roads Policing Unit in Henry Street said that: “this has been a growing problem in this community and across the country over the past year or more. All too often we see young people driving quad bikes and scramblers across green areas putting themselves and others in danger. This is a fantastic project which is being run by the Garda Project in Moyross Youth Academy which encourages young people to do something they love but in a controlled and safe environment.” Advanced Paramedic Keith Mullane who is the Operations Officer for the HSE in Limerick said “This is a great opportunity for young people to engage with staff from the Moyross Youth Academy who can show them how to use a motorcycle in a safe way, using the proper equipment and follow what they love doing.”    

The event on the 19th May 2021 involved the recreation of a serious road traffic collision involving a car and a scrambler motorcycle. Gardaí and Ambulance staff will attend the scene and treat it as they would a similar collision. The event was witnessed by 6thclass students from Corpus Christi School. It was be followed by a discussion on road safety between the students, Advanced Paramedic Keith Mullane and Sgt. Tony Miniter Limerick Roads Policing Unit and then was followed by a launch of the new documentary on the issue. 

Andrew O’Byrne of the Moyross Garda Youth Diversion Project stated: “during lockdown in 2020, with quieter roads and finer weather we saw an increase in the number of bikes and quads in the area. This prompted us to review our efforts in order to address this. Meeting with a group of like-minded people and agencies, the idea of a road safety awareness campaign was suggested around the proper use of scramblers. The documentary ‘Keeping it on Track’ was planned, filmed, edited and is being launched here today. Many thanks to all those involved who gave so freely and willingly of their time to bring the project to fruition”. The list of those involved is included in the end credit sequence. Tiernan O’Neill, Principal of Corpus Christi Primary School welcoming the launch at the school as we head into the Summer said “the timing of this launch ties in nicely with the Governments Forum on Anti-Social Behaviour who are looking at a three pillared approach of legislation, enforcement and community engagement in trying to address the issue. The motocross project seeks to promote the positive use of bikes and quads in a safe, controlled, regulated and fun way with proper instruction, appropriate safety gear and in a place that eliminates the nuisance, dangerous and illegal elements. The aim is to turn an ‘anti-social’ problem to a ‘pro-social’ programme in what could be a win:win situation for all concerned”.

You can view the documentary ‘Keeping It On Track’ below. This was produced by Simon with the help of the participants and local community.

Here is a new and exciting Scheme for Documentary Film Makers, from Film in Limerick. See the brief below.

Dear Filmmaker, 

We are delighted to share the news with you about our latest short film initiative.

ENGINE Docs is a brand new training and production scheme for emerging documentary filmmakers in the MidWest region. 

Supported by Limerick and Clare Education and Training Board and delivered in partnership with the prestigious Sheffield DocFest in England, ENGINE Docs will train and support up-and-coming talent based in the region to work as documentary directors and producers.Participants at Sheffield DocFest Industry MarketUp to 12 Shortlisted teams will receive training from Irish and international documentary experts to develop their project ideas and 4 teams will be awarded production funding of up to €10,000 each to produce a short 10-minute documentary film.

Shortlisted directors and producers will also receive accreditation for this year’s Sheffield DocFest’s online programme of films, talks and industry sessions, which runs from 4-13 June.Audience at Sheffield DocFestFilm in Limerick is committed to developing and nurturing new documentary film talent in the Mid-West and we are beyond thrilled to partner with one of the world’s best documentary film festivals to deliver this new training and production scheme. Our ambition is that it will offer local aspiring and emerging documentary talent a professional progression route to working in the industry.

Applications are now open for emerging and experienced producers and directors interested in pursuing a career in documentary filmmaking.

For more information and details about how to apply click here.If you have any enquiries regarding the scheme, you can contact us at enginedocsscheme@gmail.com

Deadline for applications is Monday 24 May 2021 at 12 noon

Yours,
Paul

Paul C. Ryan
Regional FIlm Manager
Film in Limerick ENGINE Docs is an initiative of Innovate Limerick through Film in Limerick. It is supported by Limerick and Clare Education and Training Board and delivered in partnership with Sheffield DocFest. We thank all our funders, supporters and champions for helping us to develop the screen industries in the Mid-West.

An article By Fred Ginsburg, CAS, Ph. D.

The first semester of having to teach online is over. It was a unique experience both for faculty as well as students. Some were able to handle it fairly well; we are a profession of technically adept filmmakers, after all.

But with the high probability of the Fall 2020 semester also being primarily online, and maybe even the following Spring 2021 (depends on when we see pharmacologic solutions), many students are having second thoughts about continuing their education. They are thinking, “Is it worth it? Maybe this is the time to take a semester or two off?”

Initially, the thought of taking a long sabbatical makes sense. Learning online is not the most effective means to learn filmmaking. After all, the production of films involves a lot of hands-on and close social activity. Only the act of scriptwriting is a solitary vocation.

However, as much as most of us Production Faculty want to reassure ourselves that the hands-on components of what we teach is state-of-the-art and irreplaceable – the realistic fact is that we only cover the tip of the iceberg.

Most of what we teach involves mindset and understanding the basic principles of our technical crafts (cinematography, editing, audio, etc.). It is not so much about the specific equipment, but what to do with said equipment in order to communicate.

This semester made me realize that most of what I had to share with my students was an understanding of how and why we do what we do on the set. I recalled the first thing that I concluded after leaving college with a freshly printed diploma and transcript. Working with seasoned professionals in Hollywood taught me more (technically) in several weeks than I had learned over four years on campus! The equipment and technology were way beyond the amateur levels provided by our film department.

However, my overall understanding of aesthetics and production flow was equal, if not sometimes superior to that of the veteran crew around me. So, my education was successful in terms of teaching me the big picture. I knew the principles of lighting, just not the nicknames of all the Mole-Richardson lights nor how to thread up a 35mm ARRI. I understood what was necessary to record on set, just not how to operate the fancy mixing panels and other gear.

The point that I am making is that most of what you will ultimately derive from a college degree in film/video/media does not rely solely on hands-on experience. It comes from learning the underlying thought processes, goals, and mindset of a professional. It goes hand in hand with learning the fundamental concepts of filmmaking, including the aesthetics, art, and business aspects.

It is about being pointed in the right direction, so that you know what you need to continue mastering on your own. What instructional videos to watch on the internet, what software is essential, and the industry standards. Seminars and workshops sponsored by guilds and manufacturers. User groups.

Practical Considerations Against Postponing College

By continuing to attend online, you keep your mind sharp and progress through your degree program. Sure, you will miss out a lot of the hands-on experience, but as I have learned in my many years of life on this planet: most of the hands-on training that you get at the majority of even the elite film programs does not equate to the levels that we operate at in the industry.

Your degree in film is not respected for what a college may or may not prepare you for in terms of hardware proficiency. That is a skillset that you can rapidly acquire with but a few weeks of workshops and seminars. On your own, or through post-curricular events sponsored by your college department.

For example, the department in which I teach has had numerous discussions regarding conducting special sessions as soon as it is deemed safe to do so, with many instructors even volunteering their own time and resources to make these happen. (When you leave Hollywood in order to teach, it certainly is not for the money!)

As a student, keep in mind that many of your classes are outside of the production realm. Writers learn much from understanding psychology, sociology, and history. Producers and freelancers should master accounting, contract law,  and other business-related subjects.

If you do decide to take time off, what do you plan on doing with it?

Internships, during a pandemic, are scarce – and rarely involve any hands-on due to social distancing.

Earn money while you are no longer in college? Doing what? The economy is barely hiring right now, unless you want to be a delivery driver. Retail establishments are more concerned about hiring back some of the people that they had to lay off. There is no great rush to bring in a bunch of high school grads (who did not complete college yet) and offer them enticing positions.

But let’s pretend that money is not the issue. You could travel the world and experience a diversity of cultures. Or maybe not, on account of this virus thing.

Having spent six months or a year sitting around in a mask and bored like hell – you decide that you are ready to return to campus…

Although the colleges may be eager for you to re-enroll, they cannot guarantee your spot in the film program. Your original “class” of film students has progressed in their academic hierarchy and are now in the more advanced courses of the curriculum. You can no longer team up with your old friends on projects.

You now have to compete, not only with all of the new students entering (or progressing) in your program, but also with all of the returning “time off-ers”.

COVID-19 has forced budget cuts at all of the colleges. Courses may not have been cut, but it is unlikely that the number of courses/sections will be increased. Departments have limited production equipment, edit bays, computer labs, screening rooms, soundstages, control rooms, large classrooms, and other physical facilities.

So even if the academic administrators approved opening up additional sections of some courses and were willing to pay the instructors, there still may not be enough resources to support that many new students in the program.

Learn what you can, while you can

Going back to college after months away can be particularly challenging from a mental standpoint. Think about how hard it is to get back into an academic routine after just a summer break!

It will be even harder after a semester or two away!

And the film industry will not welcome you without a college degree. But they will not be as concerned about your lack of hands-on set experience compared to what they may think of your lack of a focused college degree in the field.

Trust me. Once things settle down in terms of the virus, there will be lots of opportunities to get up to speed with the latest gadgets. Even with 40 years professional experience and a holder of three degrees in filmmaking (B.A., M.A., Ph.D. ), I still have to strive to keep up with all of the technological advancements raining down on our industry every year. Workshops and seminars abound.

But that decision to postpone the completion of your college degree could cost you dearly. A year of “life experience” will not equate too much in the way of practical experience. But it could easily cost you your spot in an elite film program.

Is it really worth losing a year, just because you may not get as much hands-on production experience as you will in the first few weeks after you graduate?

Fred Ginsburg, CAS, Ph.D., is a highly experienced and award winning professional sound mixer whose decades of work includes features, episodic TV series, national TV commercials, corporate, and government. He is a member of the Cinema Audio Society and the University Film & Video Association. Fred holds doctorate, graduate, and undergraduate degrees in filmmaking; has published more than 200 technical articles along with a textbook, instruction manuals, and hosts an educational website. Fred instructs location recording and post-production sound at Calif State University Northridge

On the back of this very well composed article and if you are trying to decide on the Change of Mind CAO option, then please check out the Creative Technologies Programmes at LSAD.

Creative Broadcast & Film Production

Music Technology & Production

Thinking about the C.A.O. and the change of mind option. Why not check out the LSAD Creative Technologies Programmes at the Moylish Campus.

Creative Broadcast & Film Production

Music Technology & Production

(Click on the titles for more info)

 

In light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s Graduate Show takes the form of an online showcase to celebrate the resilience, creativity and talent of our final year students.

This has been a very difficult time for our staff and students, but the indomitable spirit of LSAD and LIT has shone through. We have 228 highly talented people leaving LSAD, LIT at this juncture. These are students who have come through the most difficult of times.

We would like to thank everyone for their work and dedication to this wonderful documentary, the LSAD graduate wesite and all the hard work in between.
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The class of 2020’s collections are now live on http://www.lsadgraduates.ie/
Please head over, take a look and enjoy!