Archive for the ‘Film’ Category

An exciting new opportunity has just been launched for upcoming film scriptwriters via Film In Limerick and The Writer’s Factory.

PRESS RELEASE (from website HERE)
  • Introduction to Screenwriting Course

    Begins Monday 19th October 2020. 7pm – 9.30pm (online)

     

    Innovate Limerick through Film in Limerick and Limerick and Clare Education and Training Board are delighted to announce the launch of Writers Factory, a new screenwriting programme for budding film & TV writers in the Mid-West.

    This 22-week programme is designed by legendary UK script-guru Phil Parker and is available for the first time in Ireland through a partnership with Film in Limerick. In recent years, Writers Factory has grown in to the gold-standard of screenwriting courses and has launched the careers of many successful screenwriters.

    The programme will take place online on Monday nights at 7pm to 9.30pm, starting on 19 October and running for 22 weeks. The Writers Factory programme is suitable for both aspiring and emerging screenwriters with an interest in writing for film and TV.

    The introductory course will give participants a strong foundation in the craft and art of screenwriting and help them to develop a framework for screenwriting practice. Participants will complete a 10 minute short script as part of the course and have the opportunity to pitch their project to producers and directors and receive feedback.

    The course develops from an initial lecture and screening format to workshops, with group discussions and practical exercises being used throughout the programme. There is extensive use of screenings of short films and feature film extracts, handouts including first and second draft short screenplays, as well as extracts from key books, with lecturing, group discussion, individual writing exercises and small group tutorials.

    The programme, revised by Phil Parker especially for Mid-West participants will be taught by Writers Factory teacher Eleanor Yule. Yule is an award-winning writer/director, known for her feature film ‘Blinded’ and her television documentaries with Michael Palin and teaches screenwriting at the Liverpool Screen School at Liverpool John Moores University.

    The initiative aims to further develop film and TV talent in the Mid-West region. The subsidised cost for the 22-week course is €100 per participant.

    To enrol please click this link HERE to go to the website and complete the short registration form and make payment.

    If you have any questions about the programme please email paul.ryan@limerick.ie

    Please note spaces are strictly limited. We will send further details to participants on how to access the online classroom space in advance of the first session.

    Happy screenwriting!

     

 

(As per Video & Film Maker.com Website )

RØDE Microphones has announced the return of the World’s Largest Short Film Competition, My RØDE Reel. Now in its 7th year, RØDE has once again upped the ante with a monumental $1 million in cash to be won. This the biggest cash prize ever offered in a short film competition, affirming My RØDE Reel as the essential calendar event for filmmakers around the world. Entries are open now and close Wednesday, October 7.

What is My Røde Reel?

My RØDE Reel is the World’s Largest Short Film Competition. Over the last six years, more than 16,000 films have been submitted to the competition from 94 different countries, with RØDE awarding over $3.5 million in prizes to both emerging and established filmmakers. My RØDE Reel has launched hundreds of careers through providing a global platform for filmmakers to gain exposure, offering grants and scholarships, and giving away tonnes of RØDE microphones and filmmaking gear. In 2020, My RØDE Reel is bigger and better than ever.

The Prizes & Categories

The winners of My RØDE Reel 2020 will receive a share of US $1 million, the biggest cash prize ever offered in a short film competition.

This announcement comes off the back of RØDE Founder and Chairman Peter Freedman’s purchase of Kurt Cobain’s iconic ‘MTV Unplugged’ guitar for a world record-breaking US $6.01 million at auction. The guitar was bought to spotlight the struggles of the global arts industry; Mr. Freedman plans to take it on a worldwide tour of exhibitions, with all proceeds (including the guitar) going to the performing arts.

“Giving creatives a leg up has always been fundamental to what we do as a company,” says RØDE CEO Damien Wilson. “Whether it’s been through giving away gear, awarding scholarships or providing a platform to get their work in front of a huge audience, the objective of My RØDE Reel has always been to help filmmakers take the next step in their career.”

“We are incredibly excited to be giving away this massive cash prize,” he continues. “People in the film industry are doing it tough right now. This year, we wanted to not only give entrants the chance to win RØDE mics and awesome gear, but also offer a substantial amount of money to help kickstart the career of the next big thing, fund new projects, or cover living expenses so filmmakers can continue to work through these trying times. This money will make a big difference for a lot of people.”

The top three films for each of the competition categories will win a share in the $1 million cash prize pool, except for the major prize, the Judges’ Choice, which has just one life-changing prize of $200,000.

There are 10 categories in total: five genre categories – Drama, Comedy, Action, Documentary, Animation and Behind-The-Scenes – and five special categories – Judges’ Choice, People’s Choice, Sound Design, Young Filmmaker, and Best Chinese Film. All-in-all, 28 filmmakers will win a share in the prize money.

As well as this incredible cash prize pool, RØDE is giving away a prize pack to the winners of the 10 categories. These are loaded with gear from the world’s leading filmmaking brands, including LUMIX, Nanlite, Zhiyun, Mzed, Musicbed, Rhino, Adobe, Brevite, Pelican, ARRI and, of course, RØDE microphones and accessories. Combined with the cash, this brings the total prize pool to over $1.5 million, by far the biggest offering for any short film competition.

Visit the My RØDE Reel website for more information on the prizes and categories.

How To Enter

  • Head to myrodereel.com and log in or sign up for an account to access the starter pack. This contains the My RØDE Reel title card, which must feature at the start of your film.
  • Make a 3-minute short film. The brief is completely open – use the different categories to inspire the direction of your film.
  • Make a 3-minute behind-the-scenes (BTS) film, which must feature a RØDE product.
  • Upload your short film and BTS film to YouTube, then submit this link to myrodereel.com.
  • Share your film for a chance to win a People’s Choice Prize.

For the full details on how to enter, head to myrodereel.com and log in or sign up for an account. This contains the starter pack, information on the competition, freebies, tips, inspiration and more.

Entries are open now and close at 12PM (AEDT/GMT+10) Wednesday, October 7, 2020.
Head to myrodereel.com for more info

RØDE Microphones: www.rode.com

Press Release: 21/07/2020

Emerging Filmmakers Selected for Masterclasses with Multi-Award-Winning Producer David Puttnam through the Puttnam Scholars Scheme

Screen Skills Ireland, the skills development unit within Screen Ireland, is delighted to partner with Northern Ireland Screen, Future Screens NI and Atticus Education to offer eight individuals (four Northern Ireland residents and four Republic of Ireland residents) the opportunity to attend 6 two hour online masterclasses with Oscar-winning producer David Puttnam (MIDNIGHT EXPRESS, CHARIOTS OF FIRE, THE KILLING FIELDS).

The participants will also receive a special Scholarship from Atticus Education of €1,500 each, which they can use to further their career development. The scholarship bursaries are supported by Accenture in Ireland.

Speaking about the initiative, David Puttnam said, “This Atticus Education-Puttnam Scholars initiative with Screen Ireland and Northern Ireland Screen is something about which I am truly excited. The series will provide participants with new ways of thinking about their careers, encouraging them to consider why the role of cinema may be ever more important during these unsettled days; days that may be filled with anxiety and change, but – with the right story to tell – also offer the possibility of renewal and hope.”

The eight participants are all up-and-coming writers, directors, or producers that have either made their first feature or television drama or are in the process of developing their first feature or television drama.

The four Northern Ireland participants were selected through a Future Screens NI initiative and the four Republic of Ireland participants were nominated by four Irish higher education institutions.

The eight participants are:

  • Mark McNally – Screenwriter selected by Future Screens NI
  • Grace Sweeney – Documentary Producer/Director selected by Future Screens NI
  • Kiran Archarya – Documentary Filmmaker selected by Future Screens NI
  • Janine Cobain – Producer selected by Future Screens NI
  • Simon Doyle – Producer nominated by IADT
  • David O’Sullivan – Producer/Director nominated by TU Dublin
  • Laura O’Shea – Actor/Writer/Director nominated by Limerick School of Art and Design
  • Sean Clancy – Director nominated by Galway Mayo Institute of Technology

The Atticus Education Puttnam Scholars masterclasses will be online and fully interactive. They are designed to enhance participants’ understanding of the creative process, and the cultural context within which the screen industries operate. Across the six masterclasses, David Puttnam will explore the following themes:

  1. The Origin: Why does film matter?
  2. The Power of Identity: How can film make the personal universal?
  3. From Plot to Premiere: How a small idea can make its way to the screen, using the case-study of Local Hero.
  4. The Evolution of Creativity: How to cultivate ideas and innovation on set
  5. Music and Meaning: How do you know what you want your film to sound like?
  6. Interpreting the Future: How ongoing changes across the screen industries have been accelerated by the global pandemic.

Commenting on the scheme, Désirée Finnegan, CEO of Screen Ireland said, “We are delighted to be collaborating with Northern Ireland Screen, on the exciting Atticus Education-Puttnam Scholars initiative, which provides a unique opportunity for emerging creative talent to learn from acclaimed and visionary Oscar-winning producer David Puttnam. This initiative is a great example of innovation in sectoral learning that is more relevant than ever in these times, as the masterclasses will all be online and fully interactive. We are very proud to support this programme and wish the participants every success as they develop their careers.”

Richard Williams, Chief Executive of Northern Ireland Screen, said; “We are delighted to be working with Screen Ireland on the Puttnam Scholars initiative which offers eight emerging filmmakers an exceptional opportunity to learn from one of the best in the business, David Puttnam. Opportunities like this are needed more than ever in the current climate. Access to an industry heavyweight like David is invaluable at this early stage of their careers. We wish all the participants every success.”

Well done to LSAD Creative Tech Graduate Laura O’Shea on her selection.

An article By Fred Ginsburg, CAS, Ph. D.

The first semester of having to teach online is over. It was a unique experience both for faculty as well as students. Some were able to handle it fairly well; we are a profession of technically adept filmmakers, after all.

But with the high probability of the Fall 2020 semester also being primarily online, and maybe even the following Spring 2021 (depends on when we see pharmacologic solutions), many students are having second thoughts about continuing their education. They are thinking, “Is it worth it? Maybe this is the time to take a semester or two off?”

Initially, the thought of taking a long sabbatical makes sense. Learning online is not the most effective means to learn filmmaking. After all, the production of films involves a lot of hands-on and close social activity. Only the act of scriptwriting is a solitary vocation.

However, as much as most of us Production Faculty want to reassure ourselves that the hands-on components of what we teach is state-of-the-art and irreplaceable – the realistic fact is that we only cover the tip of the iceberg.

Most of what we teach involves mindset and understanding the basic principles of our technical crafts (cinematography, editing, audio, etc.). It is not so much about the specific equipment, but what to do with said equipment in order to communicate.

This semester made me realize that most of what I had to share with my students was an understanding of how and why we do what we do on the set. I recalled the first thing that I concluded after leaving college with a freshly printed diploma and transcript. Working with seasoned professionals in Hollywood taught me more (technically) in several weeks than I had learned over four years on campus! The equipment and technology were way beyond the amateur levels provided by our film department.

However, my overall understanding of aesthetics and production flow was equal, if not sometimes superior to that of the veteran crew around me. So, my education was successful in terms of teaching me the big picture. I knew the principles of lighting, just not the nicknames of all the Mole-Richardson lights nor how to thread up a 35mm ARRI. I understood what was necessary to record on set, just not how to operate the fancy mixing panels and other gear.

The point that I am making is that most of what you will ultimately derive from a college degree in film/video/media does not rely solely on hands-on experience. It comes from learning the underlying thought processes, goals, and mindset of a professional. It goes hand in hand with learning the fundamental concepts of filmmaking, including the aesthetics, art, and business aspects.

It is about being pointed in the right direction, so that you know what you need to continue mastering on your own. What instructional videos to watch on the internet, what software is essential, and the industry standards. Seminars and workshops sponsored by guilds and manufacturers. User groups.

Practical Considerations Against Postponing College

By continuing to attend online, you keep your mind sharp and progress through your degree program. Sure, you will miss out a lot of the hands-on experience, but as I have learned in my many years of life on this planet: most of the hands-on training that you get at the majority of even the elite film programs does not equate to the levels that we operate at in the industry.

Your degree in film is not respected for what a college may or may not prepare you for in terms of hardware proficiency. That is a skillset that you can rapidly acquire with but a few weeks of workshops and seminars. On your own, or through post-curricular events sponsored by your college department.

For example, the department in which I teach has had numerous discussions regarding conducting special sessions as soon as it is deemed safe to do so, with many instructors even volunteering their own time and resources to make these happen. (When you leave Hollywood in order to teach, it certainly is not for the money!)

As a student, keep in mind that many of your classes are outside of the production realm. Writers learn much from understanding psychology, sociology, and history. Producers and freelancers should master accounting, contract law,  and other business-related subjects.

If you do decide to take time off, what do you plan on doing with it?

Internships, during a pandemic, are scarce – and rarely involve any hands-on due to social distancing.

Earn money while you are no longer in college? Doing what? The economy is barely hiring right now, unless you want to be a delivery driver. Retail establishments are more concerned about hiring back some of the people that they had to lay off. There is no great rush to bring in a bunch of high school grads (who did not complete college yet) and offer them enticing positions.

But let’s pretend that money is not the issue. You could travel the world and experience a diversity of cultures. Or maybe not, on account of this virus thing.

Having spent six months or a year sitting around in a mask and bored like hell – you decide that you are ready to return to campus…

Although the colleges may be eager for you to re-enroll, they cannot guarantee your spot in the film program. Your original “class” of film students has progressed in their academic hierarchy and are now in the more advanced courses of the curriculum. You can no longer team up with your old friends on projects.

You now have to compete, not only with all of the new students entering (or progressing) in your program, but also with all of the returning “time off-ers”.

COVID-19 has forced budget cuts at all of the colleges. Courses may not have been cut, but it is unlikely that the number of courses/sections will be increased. Departments have limited production equipment, edit bays, computer labs, screening rooms, soundstages, control rooms, large classrooms, and other physical facilities.

So even if the academic administrators approved opening up additional sections of some courses and were willing to pay the instructors, there still may not be enough resources to support that many new students in the program.

Learn what you can, while you can

Going back to college after months away can be particularly challenging from a mental standpoint. Think about how hard it is to get back into an academic routine after just a summer break!

It will be even harder after a semester or two away!

And the film industry will not welcome you without a college degree. But they will not be as concerned about your lack of hands-on set experience compared to what they may think of your lack of a focused college degree in the field.

Trust me. Once things settle down in terms of the virus, there will be lots of opportunities to get up to speed with the latest gadgets. Even with 40 years professional experience and a holder of three degrees in filmmaking (B.A., M.A., Ph.D. ), I still have to strive to keep up with all of the technological advancements raining down on our industry every year. Workshops and seminars abound.

But that decision to postpone the completion of your college degree could cost you dearly. A year of “life experience” will not equate too much in the way of practical experience. But it could easily cost you your spot in an elite film program.

Is it really worth losing a year, just because you may not get as much hands-on production experience as you will in the first few weeks after you graduate?

Fred Ginsburg, CAS, Ph.D., is a highly experienced and award winning professional sound mixer whose decades of work includes features, episodic TV series, national TV commercials, corporate, and government. He is a member of the Cinema Audio Society and the University Film & Video Association. Fred holds doctorate, graduate, and undergraduate degrees in filmmaking; has published more than 200 technical articles along with a textbook, instruction manuals, and hosts an educational website. Fred instructs location recording and post-production sound at Calif State University Northridge

On the back of this very well composed article and if you are trying to decide on the Change of Mind CAO option, then please check out the Creative Technologies Programmes at LSAD.

Creative Broadcast & Film Production

Music Technology & Production

12 June – 13 July 2020

From June 12 to July 13, the Institut Français offers a selection of short and feature films from its IFcinéma’s catalogue to watch online for free. For young audiences as well as adults, from animation to fiction, including documentaries, experience a selection of films from the comfort of your home!

Watch here for FREE: https://ifcinema.institutfrancais.com/fr/alacarte

Find out more

Find out more free events on the Cultural Newsletter for June:

https://mailchi.mp/ambafrance-ie.org/newsletter-june-2020b

Thinking about the C.A.O. and the change of mind option. Why not check out the LSAD Creative Technologies Programmes at the Moylish Campus.

Creative Broadcast & Film Production

Music Technology & Production

(Click on the titles for more info)

 

In light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s Graduate Show takes the form of an online showcase to celebrate the resilience, creativity and talent of our final year students.

This has been a very difficult time for our staff and students, but the indomitable spirit of LSAD and LIT has shone through. We have 228 highly talented people leaving LSAD, LIT at this juncture. These are students who have come through the most difficult of times.

We would like to thank everyone for their work and dedication to this wonderful documentary, the LSAD graduate wesite and all the hard work in between.
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The class of 2020’s collections are now live on http://www.lsadgraduates.ie/
Please head over, take a look and enjoy!

 

LSAD Graduate Show Promo. Special thanks to Pat Shortt, Mark Griffin, Daragh Dukes and all the contributors from LSAD and LIT. Tune into the Facebook page at 3pm Sat 30th May, to see the programme featuring LSAD Students’ work and a few special guests!!!

Click on image to goto the link to register.

 ‘To cut a long story short’,

Online workshop for aspiring film editors hosted by Film in Limerick 

Free online workshop will explore the art of editing and career opportunities in the field 

Media Release Thursday 7 May 2020 

Simon at his edit suite.

Innovate Limerick through Film in Limerick is delighted to announce that local film editor Simon McGuire, will join us Wednesday 6 May at 2pm for a free online webinar on working as a film editor. 

The workshop is the latest in the Wednesday Workshops series and is open to anyone in the Mid-West with an interest in filmmaking. 

With over twenty five years’ experience in film and broadcast editing, with credits including; RTÉ’s Killinaskully, Mattie and Kevin Liddy’s, The Suffering Kind. Simon lectures on the craft of editing at Limerick School of Art & Design (LIT), and is currently undertaking a Doctorate of Education in Creative Media Practice at Bournemouth University, UK. 

The workshop, titled ‘To cut a long story short’, will explore Simon’s process and the craft of editing as well as the tools he uses to create stories. The session will also focus on work opportunities in Ireland and further training possibilities for aspiring and developing editors. 

Editing time line for the short film ‘Before His Eyes’ (2020). Director, Paul Boyle.

Regional Film Manager, Paul C. Ryan, says: “we are thrilled that Simon will be joining us for what promises to be a really useful workshop for anyone aspiring to develop a career as a full-time editor in Ireland. Simon is one of our most talented editors and a great champion for film students in the region. 

The workshop is the fifth of 10 free online ‘Wednesday Workshop’ events that 

Film in Limerick is running for aspiring and practicing filmmakers in the MidWest. The initiative is supported by Limerick and Clare Education and Training Board. 

Register for the event here 

Editing timeline for ‘The Suffering Kind’ Director, Kevin Liddy

Editing Timeline for the Limerick documentary. ‘The Picture House’

Film In Limerick – Wednesday Workshop

This weeks ‘Wednesday Workshop’, hosted by Film In Limerick, brought an insightful online talk from John McDonnell (Producer) / Lorcan Finnegan (Director) of the newly released feature film, Vivarium.

Hosted by Paul C. Ryan, Film Co-Ordinator of Film in Limerick, the online audience we given a brief account of the detail into the production of the acclaimed thriller which is available through online platforms.

 

Key Points Discussed were
  • The idea came from the real world ghost estates and a situation where people are trapped in a loop of existance.
  • Budget: $4,000,000 (estimated)
  • Screen Ireland was the largest funder. Fantastic Films / Frakas / Ping Pong Films/ Lovely
  • Section 481
  • Most important part of making films is networking.
  • Each film’s financing is bespoke based on the requirements for the film.
  • Trailer of the film available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3Xy2x9NDrw
  • They had to develop a directors Look-book
  • Environment Test Video
  • Sets were built in Belgium.
  • Houses could be reversed (front garden could be changed for the rear garden)
  • Lighting was used to help reduce CGI and VFXs. Fog machines also for night time.
  • The dug hole is actually shot low angle to hide the fact it was only 8 inches deep.
  • Interior hole and house sets were filmed in Ardmore Studios in Ireland.
  • POST PRODUCTION
    • Offline/ Online and colour, in ‘Outer Limits’ (Ireland) https://www.outerlimits.ie
    • Additional work in Windmill Lane. http://www.windmilllane.com
    • VFX (Belgium)
    • There was a mixture of HoDs on the whole production in order to get the right balance between funders and the country bases.
    • Some crew had to work in both Belgium and Ireland.
  • Release and Distribution
    • Felt it would be released in Cannes. French Distributer didn’t want it to go to Cannes but Producer pushed for it as they felt Cannes was the right platform for it.
    • Release is going to be Gradual due to COVID 19.
    • Suppose to have Theatre release but France was the only place got it but they had a brief run due to the French lockdown.
    • Official Posters were put in the subway but their impact was limited due to the health crisis.
    • Downloading on VOB or SVOB would be an option but you can’t compete with the main stream release.
    • DVD / Blu-ray release is still going ahead and there is a market for it for the extras and BTS and extra content. Collectors like to collect these type of movies.
  • Advise.
    • Try and do something original, interesting and that stands out. People need to notice it. Be bold and original. Be realistic also. Try not to do too much in little time or money.

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This is one of a series of talks that will be hosted by Film In LImerick over the coming months and if you want to find out more then check out the website HERE and the facebook page HERE to sign up for the updates.