Raise the Roof, details the history and culture of rowing in Limerick. In 2014 Ireland experienced storm Darwin and Limerick Boat Club endured a devastating setback when their club house roof was ripped off in the high winds. During the course of the documentary audiences will learn about the strong spirit of the Limerick rowing community and the challenging journey to raise the funds to get the new roof.

Raise the Roof is a documentary presently in production in Ireland.

For more information on Limerick Boat Club,
Visit: limerickboatclub.com

Credits for Documentary:
Contributors (to date):

Limerick Boat Club: Hannah Fitch
Limerick Boat Club: Tony Tyne

___________________________

Projected Release Date: May 2019

————————-
Crew:

Aerial Cinematography: James Long
Editor: Simon McGuire
Director: Mark Griffin

Behind the Scenes Camera Crew:

Camera Operator: Adam Ahern
Camera Operator: Paul Shanagher

Licensing agreements
Storyful / [Damien Carton] Limerick boat club roof blown off

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Screen Training Ireland are delighted to partner with High Res in association with disguise to host the first ‘D3 Fundamental & Advanced Training Course’ in Ireland, which will take place in Dublin at the end of July.  The course will be led by Chris Simcock, an official D3 disguise trainer, who has tailored this course to suit the demands of the current film & television industry.

D3 is a state of the art media server. It is one of the first servers to have the capability to output 10 bit processing depth and is quickly becoming the primary media server platform for live and broadcast environments. The D3’s cutting edge technology can manage and synchronise a variety of different output sources, from LED screens, to projection systems, as well as tracking realtime data from systems like scenery motion control, making it a powerful collaborative tool in helping creative production teams realise their vision.

The course will run over 3 days from Tuesday 24th to Thursday the 26th of July 2018.

Image: Taoiseach Leo Varadkar at the 3D wall on the set of NIGHTFLYERS.

(Post as per Screen Training Ireland link. HERE )

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Attended the premiere screening of Declan McGrath’s documentary, ‘Lomax In Éirinn’ at the Pálás Screen 1, Galway Film Fleadh.

Great Film and well done to Declan and all the crew on a fantastic Documentary.

It will have a broadcast screening on September 15th 2018 on TG4.

Highly recommend.

 

Celebrating its 30th year the Galway Film Fleadh for 2018 promises to be jammed packed of features and shorts. As well as this there are special guests including; Ed Guiney and Andrew Lowe of Element Pictures, and actresses Marisa Tomei, and Vanessa Redgrave.

For the full programme in PDF format click the picture of the cover below.

(As per Scannain.com)

The Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Josepha Madigan T.D. today launched her Department’s €200m Audio-visual Action Plan. The industry-wide, long-term plan, under the Creative Ireland Programme, will support the Government’s ambition to enable Ireland to become a global hub for the production of Film, TV drama and animation.

The key points in the Plan include:

• Consider extending Section 481 tax relief, as well as increasing the expenditure ceiling, revising the regulations and extending the relief to Ireland’s games sector.

• A review by Screen Ireland of funding models for other countries’ film agencies.

• Increased capital funding for the film sector including co-production and development funding, a specific fund for the development of films and TV drama, a fund for new Irish TV drama, a regional production fund and additional training of film workers and crew.

• Increased business skills development, matching of skills with production growth and partnering with third level institutions in skills development.

• Increased marketing measures including measures to attract major computer games studios to Ireland.

• A steering group will prioritise measures, oversee implementation and monitor risks, reporting regularly to Minister Madigan.

The Audiovisual Action Plan is underpinned by an Economic Assessment of the Audio-Visual Industry in Ireland carried out by international consultants Olsberg SPI with Nordicity on behalf of the Departments of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Communications, Climate Action and Environment and Business, Enterprise and Innovation. As well as measuring the size and impact of the industry, the consultants identified a range of key strategic recommendations which would assist the future development and growth of the audiovisual sector in Ireland.

The consultants concluded that with the implementation of their policy recommendations, Ireland’s “film, television and animation” sector could in a period of five years, double employment to over 24,000 full-time equivalents and a gross value added of nearly €1.4 billion.

Fís Éireann/Screen Ireland (FÉ/SI) welcomes today’s publication by the Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Josepha Madigan T.D. of a €200m Audiovisual Action Plan.  The industry-wide, long-term plan, under the Creative Ireland Programme, will support the Government’s ambition to enable Ireland to become a global hub for the production of Film, TV drama and animation.

For the rest see the link HERE  or to download the report HERE

The Story of Limerick’s Cinemas

Director David Burns outside the Royal Theatre, Limerick.

Following the first documentary Kemmy (2017) (on the late Limerick Politician Jim Kemmy), comes David Burns’ second factual feature, ‘The Picture House‘. This hour long film documentary tells the story of the glory days of Limerick’s one-screen cinemas until their demise in the late 1980s.

We see how the cinema screen was, and is, the biggest cultural outlet for Limerick people, and look at the various venues that thrived in and around the City Centre. We get the idea of how most theatres mainly screened films but also mounted variety shows, concerts, operas, plays, and talent shows.

The documentary has three main threads:

  • The main cinemas, the films, shows and their market. How the venues came and went.
  • The people who worked in the cinemas, from manager to page boy. Their struggle for a proper wage.
  • The cinema-going public and their stories.The attitudes of the authorities – mainly the Church.

At its height in the sixties, Limerick had seven or eight cinemas of various standards, and the documentary looks at them with regard to their history, and their impact on Limerick’s cultural social and economic life.  We see the slow demise of the city centre cinemas due to neglect, competition from television and VHS, and the rise of the profitable suburban multiplex.

The documentary uses a presenter to tour the main cinemas.  At each venue, we get a potted history of the cinema, together with photographs and adverts from the Leader, background material –reminiscences from the staff who worked there, stories about the behaviour of the clientele, the kind of films that were shown together with film posters and snatches of music, the controversies which arose, and reminiscences from patrons.

The Picture House seeks to give an overarching flavour of the history of Cinema from the first cinema in La Ciotat in 1899, the advent of talking pictures, colour, the evolution of digital cinema and the return of the city centre cinema in the 21stCentury.

Simon is on board as Editor again and post production will take place over the summer of 2018 with a projected release in Autumn 2018.

If you’re in the position of trying to decide on your 3rd level college options and have a passion for Film and Television or even just a keen interest, then this level 7/8 programme is a must.

What is the programme about?

This skills-based programme offers students an exciting opportunity to explore the world of the broadcast media industry, covering a range of disciplines across Film & TV Production, Visual Effects, editing, radio, audio mixing, photography, as well as broadcast technologies across a range of new and traditional media platforms.

Upon successful completion of this Level 7 programme, students progress to the Level 8 BSc (Honours) degree. We offer our students a range of prospects for both academic & career progression in the broadcast, film, creative media industries, as well as extensive hands-on production work experience. If you have a story to tell, we will show you how.

Key Features of the programme:

• Industry-led Production & Post Production Practices;

• Digital Photography & Cinematography Techniques;

• Creative Design for CGI, VFX & Digital Art Direction;

• Participate in the Limerick International Film Festival (Hosted by the film production course).

• Work in our state of the art Millennium Theatre on a range of live events, including the popular Awards Show for the Richard Harris International Film Festival.

• Work on Wired FM – our student Radio Station; Industry Tours & Award-winning Visiting Lecturers;

• Industry work experience– (Stage 3 Level 7)

• Modules are driven by dedicated staff with strong industry & academic careers;

• Outstanding graduate employment opportunities in the Film & Broadcast industries.

Who is the programme suited to?

If you are interested in filmmaking and storytelling on screen, this programme aims to develop the practical creative and technical skills and knowledge you will need to succeed in the dynamic world of film and broadcast production across a range of screen platforms.

Top 3 Reasons

1. High quality facilities.

2. Practical, hands-on experience with Wired FM.

3. Industry-experienced lecturers who give you the thorough, hands-on and personal support you need to make the most of your education.

Class Contact Hours

24 hours per week

Awarding Body

Limerick Institute of Technology

Other Information

COURSE PROGRESSION LADDER

Year 4: Level 8 BSc (Hons) Audio & Video Production

For more info check out the full details HERE and make that change of mind to LIT.

Cruinniú na nÓg is a national initiative rolled out as part of Creative Ireland Programme 2017 – 2022. It’s a day of culture and creativity for and by children and young people. It’s a day for doing, making and creating!

Limerick City and County Council in association with Fresh Film Festival, Limerick Youth Service, The Hunt Museum and Happenings, invites young people and children of Limerick to celebrate culture and creativity through the interdisciplinary and collaborative medium of film. The programme of events spans across the city and county of Limerick, including film production workshops, arts and creativity workshops, screenings and a special highlight of the day, a Young Film Convention.

All events are free.

Green Light Limerick: Young Film Convention

https://www.limerick.ie/discover/whats-on/theatre-film-dance/green-light-limerick-young-film-convention

Celebrate the wonderful world of film with a fun-filled day meeting other cineastes. Come dressed as your favourite movie character and take part in our parade of movie heroes. Try out a green screen, chat to Limerick’s young YouTube sensations, watch mini-screenings of movies for and by young people, or simply soak up the atmosphere. Bring your favourite model or build something new with 100kg of Lego provided by Bric Con Limerick! All young visitors must be supervised by guardians at all times.

Age range: All ages
Time:11.00am – 3.00pm
Venue: Limerick City and County Council, Merchants Quay, Limerick

Green Light Limerick: Movies in the Garden

Enjoy outdoor movie screenings in the beautiful garden of The Hunt Museum with two family friendly feature films. Bring your own blanket and popcorn, and enjoy the classic titles: Jungle Book and Princess Bride.

12.00pm – 1.30pm: The Jungle Book (1967)
2.30pm – 4.10pm: The Princess Bride (1987)

Movies in the Garden are presented in association with Happenings, Fresh Film Festival and The Hunt Museum.

The event is free and no booking is required but places are limited; arrive early to avoid disappointment.

All young visitors must be supervised by guardians at all times.

Age range: All ages
Time: 12:00pm – 4:30pm
Venue: Hunt Museum, The Custom House, Rutland Street, V94 EV8A, Limerick

Green Light Limerick: Claymation at the Hunt Museum

Be a part of an animation crew and see your work on the big screen! Join one of The Hunt Museum’s claymation and stop motion workshops. The two workshops will take the Hunt Museum Summer Exhibition “Signals of Change” as a point of departure to produce a short animation.

The stop motion animation will be brought together over the course of two workshops and presented to the public as part of an outdoor screening in The Hunt Museum Garden.

Places are limited and booking is essential. Booking: https://form.jotformeu.com/educationhuntmuseum/stop-motion-animation-day
Age and Time: 10am – 11.30am: 4 to 8 year olds, and 12.30pm – 2.30pm: for 9 to 12 year olds.
Venue: Hunt Museum, Rutland Street, Limerick, V94 EV8A
Green Light Limerick: Film Production Workshops

On the day of Cruinniú na nÓg, young filmmakers across Limerick will engage with the practice of filmmaking and learn new skills to develop their ability to make movies.

The workshops dedicated to developing dynamic camera skills and scene crafting will take place across Limerick led by local, professional filmmakers in association with Fresh Film Festival and Limerick Youth Service. Participants dive into film production with these intensive workshops in filmmaking exploring the process of taking an idea to a finished film.

Four workshops will be held simultaneously in Kilfinane (11am – 2pm), Rathkeale (11am – 2pm), Abbeyfeale (11am – 2pm), and Limerick City (11am – 4pm).

Participation is free but booking is essential, please contact info@freshfilmfestival.net

Age range: 13+
Time: 11.00am – 2.00pm/11.00am – 4.00pm
Venue: Across Limerick County and City

Green Light Limerick: Movies at the Libraries

We invite our youngest citizens and their parents for a fun and relaxing morning at the local library with a special screening of the classic silent movie Safety Last!  The screening will be followed by a colouring workshop. Visitors will be also invited to explore a display of books, that have been turned into films.

Six Libraries in Limerick City and County will host this event. These will be The Granary Library, Watch House Cross Library, Newcastle West Library, Kilmallock Library, Dooradoyle Library and Adare Library. Please contact your local library for further information.

The event is free and no booking is required but places are limited; arrive early to avoid disappointment.
All young visitors must be supervised by guardians at all times.

Age range: 0-4; All ages
Venue: Libraries across Limerick

For further information please contact: 

Limerick Culture & Arts Office
Email: artsoffice@limerick.ie
Phone: 061 557363 / 061 525031

Content as per press release from Limerick Cultural & Arts Office.

 

 

As the good weather arrives once again and the urge to capture stories, action and imagination takes hold of film makers young and old alike, there is a need for reflection on the current state of resources for the film makers in our cultural rich city.

While there is an insurgence of interest in the mid-west due to the arrival of Troy Studios, and their first collaboration with the producers of the Nightflyers series, I do feel that there’s maybe not enough support for the novice, students and even freelance professional filmmakers so that they can aspire to the levels that is expected by Troy and Nightflyers.

Why so? Well you can only compare to the other urban areas around Limerick such as Galway, awarded the 2020 City of Culture as well as a UNESCO city for film, which has a Film centre, the Oscar affiliated Galway Film Fleadh as well as a rich television, film and media industry in the city and county with the likes of TG4 studios and Telegael. Galway has been very attractive for students to study in the field of film making with NUIG Huston Film School also located within walking distance to the central hub.

While Limerick also has a strong student population with third level educational institutions offering courses from Fine Art, Journalism, Music Technology as well as Creative Broadcast and Film Production there is a lack of outside support in the form of a film centre or hub venue where communities can meet on a daily basis.

There were numerous attempts to get one off the ground, including ‘The Royal‘ which would have supported a couple of medium sized cinema screens for film, as well as a training centre and equipment hire facilities for the film making community, however due to lack of visible backing from the local authorities and business community along with other road blocks (mainly financial, this idea remains just that, an idea, and an opportunity lost.

While the Belltable is considered the closest thing Limerick has to an Arts Centre and screens Irish films through their collaboration with the IFI in Dublin, it is under the control for commercial use by The Limetree Theatre. The venue itself would be fine but having a screening venue is not enough. Film makers need a base from which to work from not a theatre space at a cost ( that most new film makers can’t afford) which is also limited by the other commercial demands and requirements of the space.

So what to do! Well the answer maybe in with collaboration with the higher educational bodies of our city and county whose resources are already in place and in most would be under utilised during the holiday periods when the students have left for the summer break. Three areas can be identified through the requirements film makers have;

  1. Training support – as technology changes and updates in the industry, the pressure for an unemployed film maker to keep up to date with it becomes increasingly difficult. Reading about the equipment on the web is once thing but to actually have some training with the equipment or software at a price base that is affordable would be a huge advantage. Also there is an opportunity for these educational bases to become hubs for the film makers as they attempt to complete their short films or other projects. This would also create a better position for the educators to create a community and culture of film and broadcast making in the city and county as well as future cohorts on their respective undergraduate programmes in the new academic year.
  2. Information and Resources – While there have been networking websites for film makers in Limerick in the past, there is a lack of an up-to-date (a “GO TO”) website for the Limerick region. While there are Facebook pages run by groups such as LACE Film Strand and previously Behind The Scenes (since disbanded) there is a lack current information resource pages for the Limerick film community. Since the coming of Troy Studios there has also been the introduction of the ‘FILM IN LIMERICK’ website. While this was an exciting addition to the community (created in conjunction with Innovate Limerick) there is little in the way of updates. In fact the website has not changed in its content since it was introduced over a year ago. In order to keep the ideas and events fresh this content needs to be updated and flowing each week. Educational institutions have the power to influence here also. With lecturers and trainers required to be in contact with industry on a regular bases there are opportunities for them to be either involved in the ‘Film in Limerick’ website through collaboration or to create a new one (maybe in conjunction with the training support) that fits the requirements of a diverse group such as the film community. This could even be a collaborative project that could work between educational institutions such as UL and their Journalism students along with the Creative Technology students of LIT, Television Production Students of LCFE and the Fine Art students of LSAD. All contributing and collaborating with each other along with the local film making community. After all it may well be those students who become the new batch of content creators in the future.
  3. Screening and Marketing – Finally, I think that its one thing to get support in training and information to make films, but there is also a need to correctly market and screen the work. Alot of the time, new short film makers make so much effort in the production and post production of their films only to be limited in the distribution methods available, mainly uploading to YouTube, Vimeo or other online mediums (mainly because they are free forms of distribution). There are other opportunities however. Both UL and LIT run film club screenings for students and film buffs alike. There is an opportunity to screen those short films before the main features. The advantages for the new film makers is obvious, giving them a chance to see their work on the big screen as well as gauging an audience’s reaction to the work. For the institutions they would benefit from new audiences as well as encouraging the new talent and thus creating a stronger culture of film making to the mid-west region. As current film festivals such as ‘Fresh Film Festival’, and ‘The Richard Harris Film Festival’, amongst others, work with the likes of the educational bodies in Limerick we must also support these events into our yearly calendars. Having well established film festivals on our door step is a gift for film makers to output to professionals and audiences both nationally and internationally. Working more closely with these festivals would improve their local film maker base and provide more local content to their scheduled events and screenings they put on during the year.

These are three areas that could be developed using what is already available in the region rather than trying to inject huge amounts of money, that is obviously not available from the local authority at this time. If there was some forward thinking, planning and collaboration, then these could be achieved to create a new and fresh film making culture where future employment could be possible. Troy Studios have stated an number of occasions that they are a facility provider not an employer of crew. Should local film makers receive the training opportunities, get support and resources to create and screen films and other content, then we will see a new workforce that will be attractive and in demand, by production companies coming to Troy. It is Troy Studios job to bring in the big clients and productions like ‘Night Flyers’. In order to make their job easier, there needs to be an attractive new workforce that can meet the demands of such productions and complement the established professional facilities in Castletroy.

While all of these suggestions are well on paper (or screen in this case), they are ideas, and it does take a certain number of people to realise these to reality. And it must happen if we are to keep the film making talent in the region. To continue to lose them to our neighbouring cities and beyond will be an opportunity missed to strengthen the  film culture here. In order to give more opportunities to the film making community in Limerick city and county, there must be more of a collaboration between these groups and others, feeding the enthusiasm of imagination. Only then we may see the benefits in the creative culture of the Limerick film craftspeople of the future.

 

With over 24 years experience in Film and Broadcast Editing, Simon is a lecturer in Post Production at Limerick Institute of Technology and is undertaking a Professional Doctorate of Education in Creative Media Practice with Bournemouth University, UK.

 

Avid Assistant

Things to know about the new Avid Media Composer licenses…

Posted: 10 Jun 2018 03:21 PM PDT

NAB 2018 saw Avid release a new licensing scheme. There’s a new license in town and the good news is, it’s cheaper! But what’s the catch? Here’s a quick guide…

Image from Avid Technology site.

Well, actually there’s not really too much of a catch unless you intend to use shared storage… let me tell you more.

Licenses

Licensing edit suites should be easy, but it’s usually not. While it might not be your responsibility, it’s a good idea as an Avid Assistant, to be aware of what license type you have on your workstation. Make sure it won’t run out mid-project or, if it is a monthly subscription license, does your workstation have Internet access to reactive a monthly subscription? Let’s get a better idea of how Avid licensing works.

Electronic licensing for Media Composer is done through the Application Manager. You purchase your license through the Avid website as either a perpetual or subscription license. Once finalised, your licencing information is placed into your Avid Account and from this information, your workstations can be activated. But what is the difference between these two license types?

Perpetual Licenses

This is simply a software activated license that is purchased for a single price and last for 12 months. The big advantage of this license is that it NEVER expires.  If you do not renew your license at the end of the 12 months then your Media Composer is limited to the last release closest to your licences end date. If you renew your licence you will be able to access upgrade for the next 12 months and so on.

Optional extras with Media Composer are

• Media Composer | Symphony Option which can include includes Boris Continuum Complete Lite

• Media Composer | NewsCutter Option

• Media Composer | Production Pack – includes

• NewBlue Titler Pro 2

• Sorenson Squeeze

• iZotope Insight

Subscription License

This allows you to rent Media Composer on a month to month basis. Rather than stumping up for 12 months up front, this means you can reduce your costs by paying month by month. It also has the added benefit of giving you access to options you would have to purchase if you have a perpetual license. So that’s:

• Media Composer® | Software

• Media Composer | Symphony® Option

• NewBlue Titler Pro 2.5

• Sorenson Squeeze Lite

• Boris Continuum Complete Lite

• iZotope Insight (30-day trial)

• Avid Support (including all software updates/upgrades)

The monthly subscription also means that when you don’t need Media Composer you don’t pay for it.

Media Composer Types

Media Composer | First

For people just starting out in editing, Media Composer | First delivers a complete, yet streamlined creative toolset built on Avid’s renowned editing model – for free – with all the features and functionality that can be published to popular social media channels.

NAB 2018 saw the release of Media Composer 2018.4 and while the license types remain the same this version brought with it 2 separate ‘models’ of Media Composer.

Media Composer – Sort of new…

For a lot of people working on Media Composer, they require the editing package to function on a single machine in a ‘non-collaborative’ manner. By this Avid means, we are not using it on their shared storage systems, Avid ISIS or Avid NEXIS. Users can still share content via pocket drives and move bins around freely but with this restriction comes the added benefit of a 50% reduction in price. A license can be had for as little as US$19.99 per month.

Media Composer Ultimate – NEW

This new term is, in effect, the old Media Composer license price point, with added software options bundled in. Support for Shared Projects on Avid ISIS and NEXIS is added but we now also receive  ScriptSync, PhraseFind and Symphony option in the same bundle. This is the option that most Post Houses will go for. Compare the models and their functions here

Extra Notes

Here are a few other items you should be aware of…

30 Day Trails

Avid has long allowed you to download Media Composer and run it on a 30-day trial. It’s worthwhile noting that when running in trial mode all the options are enabled, to give you an Ultimate License.

Existing Customers

If you already had a subscription in place before the new license release you will receive an Ultimate License. If you want to reduce your monthly cost, then you will need to end your old license and start a new one at the reduced cost.

Avid Support

When you purchase your Media Composer license you will have the ability to raise support cases should you experience issues with your system. If you require extended support, this can also be purchased and added to your account/license. For more information see the links below.

Here’s Avid view on the new family of licenses. and some useful links for help with Avid licensing.

Media Composer Licenses FAQ

Media Composer software support contract license update

Media-Composer-Renewal-Process