The Story of Looking with Mark Cousins & Declan McGrath | August 23rd
The Story of Looking with Mark Cousins & Declan McGrath

Speakers: Mark Cousins interviewed by Declan McGrath
Date: Thursday August 23rd, 2018.
Duration: 3pm – 4.30pm
Venue: The Portershed, Galway City.
Cost: €10. Limited places available. Booking through Eventbrite.

Course Profile: 
What is inside or outside the frame of a picture, the colours and shapes that the frame contains – these are some of the most important elements in what defines cinema. In this afternoon chat with Mark Cousins, we will go on a visual journey, exploring the story of looking in many art forms especially cinema and we will also discuss the emotion and meaning that can be produced by images. The talk will be chaired by Declan McGrath and is inspired by Mark’s new book, ‘The Story of Looking’.

Participant Profile: This talk is aimed at those working in the audio-visual sector who want to take some time out to discuss the importance of an image and its potential power.

Application procedure: 
Book your place at this EVENTBRITE: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/the-story-of-looking-with-mark-cousins-declan-mcgrath-tickets-48592908698

Email education@galwayfilmcentre.ie with any further queries.

About Mark Cousins: 
Mark Cousins is an Irish-Scottish film director, writer and occasional presenter/critic on film. He is a prolific producer and director and is best known for his 15-hour 2011 documentary ‘The Story of Film: An Odyssey’. He is returning to Galway on August 23rd to present his latest film ‘The Eyes of Orson Welles’, which includes details of Welles’ time spent in Connemara in 1931.

About Declan McGrath:
Belfast man, Declan McGrath, has recently directed and produced Lomax in Éirinn for TG4 and the BAI. In 2016, he directed and produced Mary McAleese & The Man Who Saved Europe for RTÉ and BBC (winner of the Radharc Award for Best Historical Documentary 2016). Declan has also written two books on the craft of cinema and contributes to the American film magazine, ‘Cineaste’.

Screen Shot 2018-07-31 at 14.15.50  dahg-logo-300x79

This event is run with the support of the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht.

#GalwayCityofFilm

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You can contact Galway Film Centre at
admin@galwayfilmcentre.ie 
or +353 (0) 91 770 748
#GalwayCityofFilm    #CeantarScannán

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Radharc is very pleased to announce the Call for Entries to the Radharc Awards 2018.

The Awards event will take place on Friday 26th October in the Talbot Stillorgan Hotel Mount Merrion County Dublin.

The Radharc Awards seek to celebrate excellence in documentary filmmaking and to acknowledge films of outstanding quality in the spirit of Radharc.

The Radharc Awards were established in 2002 to honour the memory of Fr Joe Dunn and Radharc’s achievements in religious affairs programmes for Irish television from 1962 to 1997, and to encourage similar quality documentary production amongst filmmakers in Ireland today.

Awards are presented every two years to the producers of documentaries for Television and Digital Media which are of outstanding quality and that address national or international topics of social justice, history, morality and faith.

The producer of the winning production for Television will receive the bronze Radharc trophy.

The winner of the documentary for Digital Media will receive a signed decorative scroll.   Further decorative scrolls may be awarded for productions that are highly commended

Category One: An award for documentaries broadcast in the qualifying period on any free to air channel on the island of Ireland.

Category Two: An award for non-broadcast documentaries produced during the same period for digital media.

It is this category (2) that should interest to third level students which is for non- televised films  in the ethos of Radharc films of old and which can be of any  length from 5 minutes upwards.

The Radharc Awards are highly coveted by film schools and students around the country and they are encouraged to submit an entry for the forthcoming awards event. The closing date for entries is  the 1st October next .
See the links below for more details and entry form:

 

Limerick Post 4th August 2018

 

The Story of Limerick’s Cinemas

Following the first documentary Kemmy (2017) (on the late Limerick Politician Jim Kemmy), comes David Burns’ second factual feature, ‘The Picture House‘. This hour long film documentary tells the story of the glory days of Limerick’s one-screen cinemas until their demise in the late 1980s.

We see how the cinema screen was, and is, the biggest cultural outlet for Limerick people, and look at the various venues that thrived in and around the City Centre. We get the idea of how most theatres mainly screened films but also mounted variety shows, concerts, operas, plays, and talent shows.

The documentary has three main threads:

• The main cinemas, the films, shows and their market. How the venues came and went.

• The people who worked in the cinemas, from manager to page boy. Their struggle for a proper wage.

• The cinema-going public and their stories.The attitudes of the authorities – mainly the Church.

At its height in the sixties, Limerick had seven or eight cinemas of various standards, and the documentary looks at them with regard to their history, and their impact on Limerick’s cultural social and economic life.  We see the slow demise of the city centre cinemas due to neglect, competition from television and VHS, and the rise of the profitable suburban multiplex.

The documentary uses a presenter to tour the main cinemas.  At each venue, we get a potted history of the cinema, together with photographs and adverts from the Leader, background material –reminiscences from the staff who worked there, stories about the behaviour of the clientele, the kind of films that were shown together with film posters and snatches of music, the controversies which arose, and reminiscences from patrons.

The Picture House seeks to give an overarching flavour of the history of Cinema from the first cinema in La Ciotat in 1899, the advent of talking pictures, colour, the evolution of digital cinema and the return of the city centre cinema in the 21stCentury.

Simon is on board as Editor again and post production will take place over the summer of 2018 with a projected release in the Autumn.

Raise the Roof, details the history and culture of rowing in Limerick. In 2014 Ireland experienced storm Darwin and Limerick Boat Club endured a devastating setback when their club house roof was ripped off in the high winds. During the course of the documentary audiences will learn about the strong spirit of the Limerick rowing community and the challenging journey to raise the funds to get the new roof.

Raise the Roof is a documentary presently in production in Ireland.

For more information on Limerick Boat Club,
Visit: limerickboatclub.com

Credits for Documentary:
Contributors (to date):

Limerick Boat Club: Hannah Fitch
Limerick Boat Club: Tony Tyne

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Projected Release Date: May 2019

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Crew:

Aerial Cinematography: James Long
Editor: Simon McGuire
Director: Mark Griffin

Behind the Scenes Camera Crew:

Camera Operator: Adam Ahern
Camera Operator: Paul Shanagher

Licensing agreements
Storyful / [Damien Carton] Limerick boat club roof blown off

Screen Training Ireland are delighted to partner with High Res in association with disguise to host the first ‘D3 Fundamental & Advanced Training Course’ in Ireland, which will take place in Dublin at the end of July.  The course will be led by Chris Simcock, an official D3 disguise trainer, who has tailored this course to suit the demands of the current film & television industry.

D3 is a state of the art media server. It is one of the first servers to have the capability to output 10 bit processing depth and is quickly becoming the primary media server platform for live and broadcast environments. The D3’s cutting edge technology can manage and synchronise a variety of different output sources, from LED screens, to projection systems, as well as tracking realtime data from systems like scenery motion control, making it a powerful collaborative tool in helping creative production teams realise their vision.

The course will run over 3 days from Tuesday 24th to Thursday the 26th of July 2018.

Image: Taoiseach Leo Varadkar at the 3D wall on the set of NIGHTFLYERS.

(Post as per Screen Training Ireland link. HERE )

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Attended the premiere screening of Declan McGrath’s documentary, ‘Lomax In Éirinn’ at the Pálás Screen 1, Galway Film Fleadh.

Great Film and well done to Declan and all the crew on a fantastic Documentary.

It will have a broadcast screening on September 15th 2018 on TG4.

Highly recommend.

 

Celebrating its 30th year the Galway Film Fleadh for 2018 promises to be jammed packed of features and shorts. As well as this there are special guests including; Ed Guiney and Andrew Lowe of Element Pictures, and actresses Marisa Tomei, and Vanessa Redgrave.

For the full programme in PDF format click the picture of the cover below.

(As per Scannain.com)

The Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Josepha Madigan T.D. today launched her Department’s €200m Audio-visual Action Plan. The industry-wide, long-term plan, under the Creative Ireland Programme, will support the Government’s ambition to enable Ireland to become a global hub for the production of Film, TV drama and animation.

The key points in the Plan include:

• Consider extending Section 481 tax relief, as well as increasing the expenditure ceiling, revising the regulations and extending the relief to Ireland’s games sector.

• A review by Screen Ireland of funding models for other countries’ film agencies.

• Increased capital funding for the film sector including co-production and development funding, a specific fund for the development of films and TV drama, a fund for new Irish TV drama, a regional production fund and additional training of film workers and crew.

• Increased business skills development, matching of skills with production growth and partnering with third level institutions in skills development.

• Increased marketing measures including measures to attract major computer games studios to Ireland.

• A steering group will prioritise measures, oversee implementation and monitor risks, reporting regularly to Minister Madigan.

The Audiovisual Action Plan is underpinned by an Economic Assessment of the Audio-Visual Industry in Ireland carried out by international consultants Olsberg SPI with Nordicity on behalf of the Departments of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Communications, Climate Action and Environment and Business, Enterprise and Innovation. As well as measuring the size and impact of the industry, the consultants identified a range of key strategic recommendations which would assist the future development and growth of the audiovisual sector in Ireland.

The consultants concluded that with the implementation of their policy recommendations, Ireland’s “film, television and animation” sector could in a period of five years, double employment to over 24,000 full-time equivalents and a gross value added of nearly €1.4 billion.

Fís Éireann/Screen Ireland (FÉ/SI) welcomes today’s publication by the Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Josepha Madigan T.D. of a €200m Audiovisual Action Plan.  The industry-wide, long-term plan, under the Creative Ireland Programme, will support the Government’s ambition to enable Ireland to become a global hub for the production of Film, TV drama and animation.

For the rest see the link HERE  or to download the report HERE

The Story of Limerick’s Cinemas

Director David Burns outside the Royal Theatre, Limerick.

Following the first documentary Kemmy (2017) (on the late Limerick Politician Jim Kemmy), comes David Burns’ second factual feature, ‘The Picture House‘. This hour long film documentary tells the story of the glory days of Limerick’s one-screen cinemas until their demise in the late 1980s.

We see how the cinema screen was, and is, the biggest cultural outlet for Limerick people, and look at the various venues that thrived in and around the City Centre. We get the idea of how most theatres mainly screened films but also mounted variety shows, concerts, operas, plays, and talent shows.

The documentary has three main threads:

  • The main cinemas, the films, shows and their market. How the venues came and went.
  • The people who worked in the cinemas, from manager to page boy. Their struggle for a proper wage.
  • The cinema-going public and their stories.The attitudes of the authorities – mainly the Church.

At its height in the sixties, Limerick had seven or eight cinemas of various standards, and the documentary looks at them with regard to their history, and their impact on Limerick’s cultural social and economic life.  We see the slow demise of the city centre cinemas due to neglect, competition from television and VHS, and the rise of the profitable suburban multiplex.

The documentary uses a presenter to tour the main cinemas.  At each venue, we get a potted history of the cinema, together with photographs and adverts from the Leader, background material –reminiscences from the staff who worked there, stories about the behaviour of the clientele, the kind of films that were shown together with film posters and snatches of music, the controversies which arose, and reminiscences from patrons.

The Picture House seeks to give an overarching flavour of the history of Cinema from the first cinema in La Ciotat in 1899, the advent of talking pictures, colour, the evolution of digital cinema and the return of the city centre cinema in the 21stCentury.

Simon is on board as Editor again and post production will take place over the summer of 2018 with a projected release in Autumn 2018.