Archive for the ‘Sound’ Category

(As per Video & Film Maker.com Website )

RØDE Microphones has announced the return of the World’s Largest Short Film Competition, My RØDE Reel. Now in its 7th year, RØDE has once again upped the ante with a monumental $1 million in cash to be won. This the biggest cash prize ever offered in a short film competition, affirming My RØDE Reel as the essential calendar event for filmmakers around the world. Entries are open now and close Wednesday, October 7.

What is My Røde Reel?

My RØDE Reel is the World’s Largest Short Film Competition. Over the last six years, more than 16,000 films have been submitted to the competition from 94 different countries, with RØDE awarding over $3.5 million in prizes to both emerging and established filmmakers. My RØDE Reel has launched hundreds of careers through providing a global platform for filmmakers to gain exposure, offering grants and scholarships, and giving away tonnes of RØDE microphones and filmmaking gear. In 2020, My RØDE Reel is bigger and better than ever.

The Prizes & Categories

The winners of My RØDE Reel 2020 will receive a share of US $1 million, the biggest cash prize ever offered in a short film competition.

This announcement comes off the back of RØDE Founder and Chairman Peter Freedman’s purchase of Kurt Cobain’s iconic ‘MTV Unplugged’ guitar for a world record-breaking US $6.01 million at auction. The guitar was bought to spotlight the struggles of the global arts industry; Mr. Freedman plans to take it on a worldwide tour of exhibitions, with all proceeds (including the guitar) going to the performing arts.

“Giving creatives a leg up has always been fundamental to what we do as a company,” says RØDE CEO Damien Wilson. “Whether it’s been through giving away gear, awarding scholarships or providing a platform to get their work in front of a huge audience, the objective of My RØDE Reel has always been to help filmmakers take the next step in their career.”

“We are incredibly excited to be giving away this massive cash prize,” he continues. “People in the film industry are doing it tough right now. This year, we wanted to not only give entrants the chance to win RØDE mics and awesome gear, but also offer a substantial amount of money to help kickstart the career of the next big thing, fund new projects, or cover living expenses so filmmakers can continue to work through these trying times. This money will make a big difference for a lot of people.”

The top three films for each of the competition categories will win a share in the $1 million cash prize pool, except for the major prize, the Judges’ Choice, which has just one life-changing prize of $200,000.

There are 10 categories in total: five genre categories – Drama, Comedy, Action, Documentary, Animation and Behind-The-Scenes – and five special categories – Judges’ Choice, People’s Choice, Sound Design, Young Filmmaker, and Best Chinese Film. All-in-all, 28 filmmakers will win a share in the prize money.

As well as this incredible cash prize pool, RØDE is giving away a prize pack to the winners of the 10 categories. These are loaded with gear from the world’s leading filmmaking brands, including LUMIX, Nanlite, Zhiyun, Mzed, Musicbed, Rhino, Adobe, Brevite, Pelican, ARRI and, of course, RØDE microphones and accessories. Combined with the cash, this brings the total prize pool to over $1.5 million, by far the biggest offering for any short film competition.

Visit the My RØDE Reel website for more information on the prizes and categories.

How To Enter

  • Head to myrodereel.com and log in or sign up for an account to access the starter pack. This contains the My RØDE Reel title card, which must feature at the start of your film.
  • Make a 3-minute short film. The brief is completely open – use the different categories to inspire the direction of your film.
  • Make a 3-minute behind-the-scenes (BTS) film, which must feature a RØDE product.
  • Upload your short film and BTS film to YouTube, then submit this link to myrodereel.com.
  • Share your film for a chance to win a People’s Choice Prize.

For the full details on how to enter, head to myrodereel.com and log in or sign up for an account. This contains the starter pack, information on the competition, freebies, tips, inspiration and more.

Entries are open now and close at 12PM (AEDT/GMT+10) Wednesday, October 7, 2020.
Head to myrodereel.com for more info

RØDE Microphones: www.rode.com

An article By Fred Ginsburg, CAS, Ph. D.

The first semester of having to teach online is over. It was a unique experience both for faculty as well as students. Some were able to handle it fairly well; we are a profession of technically adept filmmakers, after all.

But with the high probability of the Fall 2020 semester also being primarily online, and maybe even the following Spring 2021 (depends on when we see pharmacologic solutions), many students are having second thoughts about continuing their education. They are thinking, “Is it worth it? Maybe this is the time to take a semester or two off?”

Initially, the thought of taking a long sabbatical makes sense. Learning online is not the most effective means to learn filmmaking. After all, the production of films involves a lot of hands-on and close social activity. Only the act of scriptwriting is a solitary vocation.

However, as much as most of us Production Faculty want to reassure ourselves that the hands-on components of what we teach is state-of-the-art and irreplaceable – the realistic fact is that we only cover the tip of the iceberg.

Most of what we teach involves mindset and understanding the basic principles of our technical crafts (cinematography, editing, audio, etc.). It is not so much about the specific equipment, but what to do with said equipment in order to communicate.

This semester made me realize that most of what I had to share with my students was an understanding of how and why we do what we do on the set. I recalled the first thing that I concluded after leaving college with a freshly printed diploma and transcript. Working with seasoned professionals in Hollywood taught me more (technically) in several weeks than I had learned over four years on campus! The equipment and technology were way beyond the amateur levels provided by our film department.

However, my overall understanding of aesthetics and production flow was equal, if not sometimes superior to that of the veteran crew around me. So, my education was successful in terms of teaching me the big picture. I knew the principles of lighting, just not the nicknames of all the Mole-Richardson lights nor how to thread up a 35mm ARRI. I understood what was necessary to record on set, just not how to operate the fancy mixing panels and other gear.

The point that I am making is that most of what you will ultimately derive from a college degree in film/video/media does not rely solely on hands-on experience. It comes from learning the underlying thought processes, goals, and mindset of a professional. It goes hand in hand with learning the fundamental concepts of filmmaking, including the aesthetics, art, and business aspects.

It is about being pointed in the right direction, so that you know what you need to continue mastering on your own. What instructional videos to watch on the internet, what software is essential, and the industry standards. Seminars and workshops sponsored by guilds and manufacturers. User groups.

Practical Considerations Against Postponing College

By continuing to attend online, you keep your mind sharp and progress through your degree program. Sure, you will miss out a lot of the hands-on experience, but as I have learned in my many years of life on this planet: most of the hands-on training that you get at the majority of even the elite film programs does not equate to the levels that we operate at in the industry.

Your degree in film is not respected for what a college may or may not prepare you for in terms of hardware proficiency. That is a skillset that you can rapidly acquire with but a few weeks of workshops and seminars. On your own, or through post-curricular events sponsored by your college department.

For example, the department in which I teach has had numerous discussions regarding conducting special sessions as soon as it is deemed safe to do so, with many instructors even volunteering their own time and resources to make these happen. (When you leave Hollywood in order to teach, it certainly is not for the money!)

As a student, keep in mind that many of your classes are outside of the production realm. Writers learn much from understanding psychology, sociology, and history. Producers and freelancers should master accounting, contract law,  and other business-related subjects.

If you do decide to take time off, what do you plan on doing with it?

Internships, during a pandemic, are scarce – and rarely involve any hands-on due to social distancing.

Earn money while you are no longer in college? Doing what? The economy is barely hiring right now, unless you want to be a delivery driver. Retail establishments are more concerned about hiring back some of the people that they had to lay off. There is no great rush to bring in a bunch of high school grads (who did not complete college yet) and offer them enticing positions.

But let’s pretend that money is not the issue. You could travel the world and experience a diversity of cultures. Or maybe not, on account of this virus thing.

Having spent six months or a year sitting around in a mask and bored like hell – you decide that you are ready to return to campus…

Although the colleges may be eager for you to re-enroll, they cannot guarantee your spot in the film program. Your original “class” of film students has progressed in their academic hierarchy and are now in the more advanced courses of the curriculum. You can no longer team up with your old friends on projects.

You now have to compete, not only with all of the new students entering (or progressing) in your program, but also with all of the returning “time off-ers”.

COVID-19 has forced budget cuts at all of the colleges. Courses may not have been cut, but it is unlikely that the number of courses/sections will be increased. Departments have limited production equipment, edit bays, computer labs, screening rooms, soundstages, control rooms, large classrooms, and other physical facilities.

So even if the academic administrators approved opening up additional sections of some courses and were willing to pay the instructors, there still may not be enough resources to support that many new students in the program.

Learn what you can, while you can

Going back to college after months away can be particularly challenging from a mental standpoint. Think about how hard it is to get back into an academic routine after just a summer break!

It will be even harder after a semester or two away!

And the film industry will not welcome you without a college degree. But they will not be as concerned about your lack of hands-on set experience compared to what they may think of your lack of a focused college degree in the field.

Trust me. Once things settle down in terms of the virus, there will be lots of opportunities to get up to speed with the latest gadgets. Even with 40 years professional experience and a holder of three degrees in filmmaking (B.A., M.A., Ph.D. ), I still have to strive to keep up with all of the technological advancements raining down on our industry every year. Workshops and seminars abound.

But that decision to postpone the completion of your college degree could cost you dearly. A year of “life experience” will not equate too much in the way of practical experience. But it could easily cost you your spot in an elite film program.

Is it really worth losing a year, just because you may not get as much hands-on production experience as you will in the first few weeks after you graduate?

Fred Ginsburg, CAS, Ph.D., is a highly experienced and award winning professional sound mixer whose decades of work includes features, episodic TV series, national TV commercials, corporate, and government. He is a member of the Cinema Audio Society and the University Film & Video Association. Fred holds doctorate, graduate, and undergraduate degrees in filmmaking; has published more than 200 technical articles along with a textbook, instruction manuals, and hosts an educational website. Fred instructs location recording and post-production sound at Calif State University Northridge

On the back of this very well composed article and if you are trying to decide on the Change of Mind CAO option, then please check out the Creative Technologies Programmes at LSAD.

Creative Broadcast & Film Production

Music Technology & Production

Thinking about the C.A.O. and the change of mind option. Why not check out the LSAD Creative Technologies Programmes at the Moylish Campus.

Creative Broadcast & Film Production

Music Technology & Production

(Click on the titles for more info)

 

 

Hi all

Following yesterdays post, here is the new documentary by Jon Lefkovitz;

Sight & Sound: The Cinema of Walter Murch.

or watch it here:

SIGHT & SOUND: The Cinema of Walter Murch from Jon Lefkovitz on Vimeo.

 

Released on March 27th 2020, via Vimeo, is the new documentary on the work and craftsmanship of acclaimed award winning Editor/ Sound Editor, Walter Murch ACE.

Directed by Jon Lefkovitz this documentary is:

An exploration of the films and philosophy of legendary editor and sound designer Walter Murch (‘The Conversation’, ‘Apocalypse Now’), as told in his own words. (Note: Seen and enjoyed by Mr. Murch.)

(IMDB)

This will be one for the editors as well as all film makers and you can check out more from the director here….

https://vimeo.com/user5730380

For now here is the Trailer:

Pat Shortt recording the next podcast episode, with Mike Gavin (Lecturer for Music Technology & Production) on the desk.

The Wellness Hour with Paaah! Returning Soon.

After an outstanding reaction to the first three episodes of the new podcast and after a short break, due to his filming schedule on a new  television project, Pat Shortt has returned  to the the Creative Technologies Studios at the Moylish Campus.

Pat and the team are working hard to bring listeners the next three episodes featuring all the now favourite characters and their antics.

Staff and Students of the Creative Technologies are heavily involved in the production including the recording of the voice overs from Pat, Sound atmosphere and Effects sourcing, foley recording and even getting some minor voice over parts too!

The next episode will be released in the coming weeks. Check out Spotify, iTunes and other podcast locations. Also if you haven’t heard the other episodes then now is the time to catch up…

 

Students and staff of the Creative Technologies Programmes of LSAD, LIT have been working with Writer, Actor and Comedian Pat Shortt on his new Podcast, ‘The Wellness Hour with Paaaah.’

Released on Tuesday Feb 4th on all main podcast platforms, season one will consist of a new episode for the next six weeks.

For more information on the collaboration check out the poster and video below.
Here is a behind the scenes look at the making of The Wellness Hour with Paaaah!

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A message from Nora Ní Fhlatharta, Programme Leader of the Creative Broadcast & Film Production Programme, LSAD.

Day two Creative Broadcast & Film Production opendays and today we are running film screenings in our Clare St Campus and Camera demos in Moylish campus. It has been brilliant to meet with our future students. Huge thanks you to all the staff who helped out, to Art O Laoire, tecnichal supervisor, IT staff, Tom Brophy and Annette Bowman, to Des Farell and Mike Fox LSAD for making us feel so welcome, to lecturers, Simon McGuire, Muireann DeBarra, Mike Gavin, John Greenwood, and Mark Griffin, to our head of department James Greenslate, to Ken Coleman of Game art and design, but most of all to Creative Broadcast and Film production students. I get the pleasure of working with the hardest working, creative, and funfilled crew in the world. Thanks so much to all the @creativetechlit student volunteers who made our opendays a joy to be part of. Thanks a million everyone. Nora Ni Fhlatharta @lsadlimerick @limerick_it #CreativeBroadcastFilmProductionlit#openday#filmcrew

Video produced by Amerson Fortunato , 2nd Year Creative Broadcast & Film Production.

Limerick Institute of Technology Autumn Open Days 2019 will take place at the Moylish and Clare Street campuses in Limerick on Thursday 17th October and  Friday 18th October from 9:30am to 2pm

The academic teams of the Creative Broadcast & Film Production and Music Technology & Production, will be at both sites, to demonstrate and chat about the programmes, the industry and the opportunities that are available for new entrants in Sept 2020.

If you cant make it then there will be other opportunities to visit the Moylish campus and experience different events that are put on by the staff and students of the programmes, including; The Richard Harris International Film Festival Awards Show, (Oct 27th Millennium Theatre) and the end of year Student Showcase (April 2020 TBC).

For more information on the programmes click the links below:

Creative Broadcast & Film Production

Music Technology & Production

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Message from Programme Leader, Nora NiFhlatharta, of Creative Broadcast and Film Production, LSAD,LIT

Huge thank you to #CaoimheDoyle and #JeanMcgrath for delivering an amazing, fun, and energetic workshop on live #foley recording. We had a packed and enraptured audience at #themillenniumtheatretoday. I will never look at at a bunch of celery in the same way ever again. Thanks to our student assistants for all their help in setting up, Louise, Lelia, Jamie, Julie, and Thomas and to Gerry Meagher, Thomas Mulcahy & Jamie & Julie for operating the sound and lighting. Special thanks to Simon McGuire for filming the event. Hope to see you all again at our next industry focus workshop. #CreativeBroadcastFilmProductionlit LIT Limerick School of Art & Design Limerick Institute of Technology – LIT #industryfilmfocusArdmore Sound

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