Posts Tagged ‘media’

Creative Media Funding Applications

Posted: November 6, 2018 in Film, Television
Tags: ,

As per their website, Creative Europe Desk Ireland MEDIA Office, and IFTN.ie, the info and applications for funding in a number of sectors of the film and television industries has been released.

See the links below for applications deadlines and further info:

CREATIVE EUROPE MEDIA DEADLINES

Please note that there is a new online format for MEDIA Calls which are now presented in one portal with Guidelines divided into two main parts:

  • Part A gives general information about the objectives, priorities, criteria and general rules applicable to all calls for proposals.
  • Part B provides information and criteria per specific call for proposals.

CREATIVE EUROPE DESK IRELAND – MEDIA OFFICES

The Creative Europe Desk Ireland MEDIA Offices offer sector-specific information on funding opportunities for Creative Europe’s MEDIA sub-programme for the audiovisual and cinema sectors.

  • Film: Fiction, Documentary, Animation
  • Television: Drama, Animation, Documentary
  • Games: Narrative led
  • Digital Media: Apps, VR, 360
  • Festivals and Film Education
  • Training: Professional Development

CREATIVE EUROPE DESK IRELAND – MEDIA OFFICE

The Creative Europe MEDIA sub-programme is promoted in Ireland by two Offices which provide information on the programme’s funding and opportunities. We offer advice and support to applicants as well as free information seminars on industry topics, training, and networking events. The MEDIA Office is funded by the European Commission in partnership with Bord Scannán na hÉireann/The Irish Film Board and RTÉ.

Orla Clancy
Creative Europe Desk Ireland – MEDIA Office
14-16 Lord Edward Street
Dublin 2.
+353 1 6791856
email

CREATIVE EUROPE DESK IRELAND – MEDIA OFFICE GALWAY

The Creative Europe Desk MEDIA Office Galway serves as a regional MEDIA office with a remit to provide information and services as Gaeilge to the growing Irish language audiovisual community. It is funded by the European Commission in partnership with Údarás na Gaeltachta, TG4, Bord Scannán na hÉireann/The Irish Film Board, and the Galway Film Centre.

Eibhlín Ní Mhunghaile
Creative Europe Desk Ireland – MEDIA Office Galway
Cluain Mhuire, Monivea Road, Galway.
+353 91 770728
email

CREATIVE EUROPE DESK NETWORK

There are Creative Europe Desks in over 35 EU countries. Contact details for these desks can be found here.

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The Panasonic AG-AF101

Posted: October 31, 2010 in Film, media
Tags: , , ,

The Panasonic AG-AF101 – the first professional micro 4/3” video camcorder optimised for high-definition video recording was revealed at the Wildscreen Festival 2010. Available in December, the AG-AF101 will set a new benchmark for digital cinematography.

Targeted at the video and film production communities, the AF101 delivers the shallow depth of field and wider field of view of a large imager, with the flexibility and cost advantages of use with a growing line of professional quality, industry standard micro 4/3-inch lenses, filters, and adapters. The full 1080 and 720 production camera offers superior video handling, native 1080/24p recording, variable frame rates, professional audio capabilities, and compatibility with SDHC and SDXC media.

The design of the AF101’s micro 4/3-inch sensor affords depth of field and field of view similar to that of 35mm movie cameras in a less expensive, ergonomically built camera body. The AG-AF101 offers a mobile, field solution for industry professionals to capture entrancing, crisp foreground images in front of a soft blur background. Equipped with an interchangeable lens mount, the AG-AF101 is also free to use an array of cost-diverse, widely-available still camera lenses as well as film-style lenses with fixed focal lengths and primes.

The AF101 incorporates a 4/3-inch, 16:9 MOS imager. The camcorder records 1080/60i, 50i, 30p, 25p and 24p (native) and 720/60p, 50p, 30p, 25p and 24p (native) in AVCHD’s highest-quality PH mode (maximum 24Mbps). Ready for global production standards, the camcorder is 60Hz and 50Hz switchable.

The AF101 maximises the potential of its high-resolution imager with built-in ND filtering and dramatically reduced video aliasing. Standard professional interfaces include HD-SDI out, HDMI, time code recording, built-in stereo microphone and USB 2.0. The AF101 features two XLR inputs with +48V Phantom Power capability, 48-kHz/16-bit two-channel digital audio recording and supports LPCM/Dolby-AC3.

This newest Panasonic AVCCAM camcorder is the first to enjoy the benefits of advanced SDXC media card compatibility in addition to existing SDHC card support. (SDXC is the newest SD memory card specification that supports memory capacities above 32GB up to 2TB). With two SD slots, the AF101 can record up to 12 hours on two 64GB SDXC cards in PH mode.

The AG-AF101 is now available with a three-year limited warranty (one year with an additional two extra years upon registration).

 

 

 

Panasonic Website

IOV Article

 

It is time to rescue film | Ken Loach

Hi all,
Please have a read of this article as written by Ken Loach this week. If poses interesting questions on the UK Film industry, I can see certain points here that the Irish Film and television industries could learn from too.
Si.

Ken Loach
The Guardian Comment Fri 15 Oct 2010 19:00 BST
Film has the potential to be a most beautiful art, but it has been debased by US cinema, and by television

Film is an extraordinary medium. Like theatre, it has all the elements of drama. It has character, plot, conflict, resolution. You can compare it to the visual arts, to painting, to*drawing; it can document reality, like still photographs. It can explain and record like journalism, and it can be a polemic, like a pamphlet. It can be prosaic and poetic, it can be tragic and comic, it can be escapist and committed, surreal and realist. It can do all these things.
So, how have we protected and nurtured and developed this great, exciting, complex medium? How have we looked after it, and does it fulfil its potential?
Over a seven-year period, the US market share of box-office takings in British cinemas was between 63% and 80%. The UK share, which was mainly for American co-productions, was between 15% and 30%; films from Europe and the rest of the world took only 2% to 3%. So for most people it’s almost impossible to have a choice of films; you get what you’re given. As for television, only 3.3% of the films shown on TV are from European and world cinema.
Just imagine, if you went into the library and the bookshelves were stacked with 63% to 80% American fiction, 15% to 30% half-American, half-British fiction, and then all the other writers in the whole world just 3%. Imagine that in the art galleries, in terms of pictures; imagine it in the theatres. You can’t, it is inconceivable – and yet this is what we do to the cinema, which we think is a most beautiful art.
How can we change this? We could start by treating cinemas like we treat theatres. They could be owned, as they are in many cases, by the municipalities, and programmed by people who care about films – the London Film Festival, for example, is full of people who care*about films.
And we could decide to tackle television, which has become the enemy of creativity. Here, drama is produced beneath a pyramid of producers, executive producers, commissioning editors, heads of department, assistant heads of department, and so on, that sits on top of the group of people doing the work and stifles the life out of them.
Connection between the writer and the director is not approved of. Scripts are approved just before shooting, even after shooting has started. Discussions at the commissioning stage are always about other television programmes, not the primary source, not what are we making the film about.
When you get into the cutting room the same thing happens. First assemblies, when the shots are put together, go out to executives who then send notes. There’s a director’s version, immediately sacrificed when the producer comes in; then the producer’s version is discussed with the executive producer. And then that is changed, and then the commissioning editor comes in, and so on and so on.
I’m pleased to see that one or two top-ranking BBC people are going to lose their jobs. About time. It takes £1m to get them out of the door, but nevertheless they’re on their way. Maybe a few more will join them. Now let’s start cutting further down.
To think that our television is in the hands of these time-servers is nothing less than a tragedy. Because television began with such high hopes, it was going to be the National Theatre of the air. It was going to really be a place where society could have a national discourse and they’ve reduced it to a grotesque reality game. This should not be used to denigrate the idea of public service broadcasting. The commercial sector is probably worse.
What we want, and what writers need to write, are original stories, original characters, plot, conflict, things that dig into our current experience. Things that really show us how we’re living, give us a perspective on what is happening. That’s what television could do, that’s what they have betrayed.
Ratings are the prime consideration. Investigative journalism, where is it? Where’s World in Action? One director told me that he was asked to make a film about debt; they were going to do a series about debt and getting into debt. But the requirement was that there were to be no poor people, because obviously poor people are a bit depressing and they don’t sell the adverts.
Those of us who work in television and film have a role to be critical, to be challenging, to be rude, to be disturbing, not to be part of the establishment. We need to keep our independence. We need to be mischievous. We need to be challenging. We shouldn’t take no for an answer. If we aren’t there as the court jester or as the people with the questions they don’t want asked who will be?
Let’s finally start to realise the potential of this extraordinary medium that we call film.